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20121129
20121207
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 12:00am PST
is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
PBS
Nov 29, 2012 12:00am PST
to utilize their talents and the education they have received is to give them a legal status. >> suarez: the bill would to grant legal residence for those who pursue higher education or serve the u.s. military. unlike the "dream act," which failed to get through congress, the "achieve act" would not provide a path to full citizenship. and that is a sticking point for most democrats. new jersey senator bob menendez: >> they call it the achieve act. the problem with the achieve act is that it does not achieve the dream of the young people who aspire to fully participate in american life. who only know one flag that they pledge allegiance to, that is the flag of the united states. >> suarez: still, senator kyl said tuesday, the republican bill can be a first step toward broader measures. >> it will begin the discussion. and it may be that it will lead to a series of smaller steps next year rather than comprehensive reform. on the other hand i suspect that the president and others may want to put comprehensive reform on the table. but either way i think focusing on certain specific issues l
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 12:00am PST
worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti mission here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. many of these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national priorities for the rebuilding. that
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 12:00am PST
. federal education officials announced today that five states will participate in an experiment to make students spend more time in school. meanwhile, many states are already implementing a new national approach, called the "common core state standards." special correspondent elizabeth brackett of public television station wttw reports on how that's working out in chicago. reporter: chicago elementary school students have walked these stairs for more than 100 years. named for the meat-packing tycoon this chicago public school is now 87% hispanic. like many inner-city schools it is on academic probation. >> you're going to write the main idea of the story on one post-it note. then you're going to rip off another. you're just going to write two character traits. >> reporter: but now this school is on the cutting edge of the biggest change in american education in years. it is one of a small group of chicago schools that is testing the new common course state standards. so far 46 states have adopted the standards which describe what every student needs to know from kindergarten through 12t
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 12:00am PST
. the "newshour's" special correspondent for education, john merrow, has the story. >> hi, how are you. >> tell me shadman's birthday. >> reporter: today, two-year-old shadman uddin is here for his routine check up. his pediatrician, dr. cindy osman, checks his eyes, ears and heart, but that's not all. >> so tell me what kinds of things he says these days? >> juice, water. >> great. does he ever put words together? give me some examples of times he puts words together. >> mommy and umara do this. >> okay, so he's doing great with his language. >> my role is to help parents parent more effectively. how to connect with their kids more effectively, what kinds of activities they can do that will better stimulate their cognitive development and get them better prepared for doing better in school. >> reporter: she's a new breed of pediatrician. part doctor, part teacher. >> you can see a lot in how they handle a book. you can check out their fine motor skills. so i'm both checking their development and i'm getting a sense of how frequently they're read to. >> reporter: dr. osman works in the pediatric p
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
when are you dealing with it. that is the reason why educating and getting people to be tested, to identify whether they are infected or not and to counsel them if they are not infected and get them into a care treatment program, if they written effected is so terribly important. >> a lot of reasons to be encouraged and a lot of challenges ahead. dr. anthony fauci thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. you can see my interview, how to survive the plague. plus we ask journalist john cohen to take stock of the latest aids development. >> brown: and that brings us to the analysis of shields and brooks-- syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. so david, where are we on this cliff, over, under, sideways. >> we're going backwards. i guess that is a good thing. >> backing away would be good. >> we're going towards the cliff. >> and so what happened is the election happened. obama wins. clearly he ran on raising tax or raising revenue from the top 2%. center piece. republicans are not stupid. they sort of understand that. so they went through a
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 6:30pm PST
. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> because i use a lot of humorous stories in the speeches i give, i am often asked: what if you don't have much of a sense of humor? i think we all have the capability to enjoy humor. i also know lots of things get in the way: stressful and exacting jobs, maybe health problems you have or someone close to you has. those are real and they can be barriers. that said, i can't think of anything that keeps life in perspective more than cultivating and using a sense of humor. i remember my mother and dad saying this about someone they admired: he's cool, calm, and collected. i think those three apply to well-placed humor, too. cool brings a burst of fresh air into situations that can get overheated. calm: it's hard to be funny and angry at the same time. if you are both, that's sarcasm. collected: the shortest distance between two people is a smile. we collect more allies with smiles than with frowns. longtime newsman david brinkley once said, a successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with bricks others have thrown at him. maybe having
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 11:00pm PST
festival, where a well-off, educated populace has easy access to alternative organic food co-op and yoga centers. >> go get 'em! >> narrator: jennifer margulis, a writer with a ph.d in english literature, is the mother of four children. >> when my daughter was born in 1999, the nurse bustled in with her tray and said, "okay, it's time for your hepatitis b vaccine." and i looked at my daughter and i looked at the nurse, and i said, "isn't hepatitis b a sexually transmitted disease?" and i said, "why am i supposed to vaccinate my newborn baby against a sexually transmitted disease?" and the nurse got really mad. >> narrator: margulis went on to research and write about vaccines, and, in 2009, published a long article about the vaccine debate in "mothering magazine," a magazine promoting a natural lifestyle. >> why are we giving children so many vaccines? they get four times the number of vaccines than i got when i was a child growing up in the'i 70s. as a parent, i would rather see my child get a natural illness and contract that the way that illnesses have been contracted for at least 200
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)